Blank 4 String Ukulele Neck Diagram

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4 string blank ukulele neckHere you can download, save and print our blank 4 string ukulele neck diagram in PDF Format. You can use bass neck diagrams to write down scale patterns, new chords that you discover, or to help you better understand intervals. To download our free blank 4 string guitar ukulele diagram template, simply right-click on the link below, and select “Download Linked File”.




How To Use A Blank 4 String Ukulele Neck Diagram

Use A Blank 4 String Ukulele Neck Diagram to Memorize the Fretboard

There are several ways to use a blank 4 string ukulele neck diagram. First, you can write down all of the notes in the chromatic scale on the diagram. I would do this two different ways, using the chromatic scale in sharps (#), and then again in flats (b). Next, I would write out all of the natural notes on the ukulele neck diagram. This exercise will help you see important patterns and relationships on the ukulele. This is especially important for ukulele players who are new to playing a 4 string ukulele.

Use A Blank 6 String Guitar Neck Diagram To Learn Chords and Arpeggios

Next, a blank 4 string ukulele neck diagram can be used to map out various symmetrical arpeggios. Recall that an arpeggio is a broken chord.  Thus, using the blank 4 string ukulele neck diagram to map out notes from chords and arpeggios can save you vast amounts of time and frustration. This will help you memorize arpeggio shapes faster, know what notes are inside a specific arpeggio, and to also recognize what chord is being played when you arpeggiate. If you can understand the chord that you are playing, then you will also know where that chord fits into a scale, or a key signature.

Use A Blank 4 String Ukulele Neck Diagram To Memorize Scales

Finally, you can use a blank 4 string ukulele neck diagram to map out scales on the guitar. Scales are obviously going to be different on a 4 string ukulele, so it is even more important to recognize octaves and other patterns.

I would start by mapping out my favorite scales across the entire diagram, and using one color for the root notes and another color for the rest of the scale. For example, if I wanted to map out the G Major scale (which has the notes G, A, B, C, D, E and F#), then I would use the color green for all of the “G” notes, and the color black for all of the rest of the notes (A, B, C, D, E, F#) in the scale.

Another good example is to map out both E minor pentatonic (E, G, A, C and D) and E natural minor (E, F#, G, A, B, C and D). This way you can visualize the differences. Look for patterns and relationships on the ukulele. For example, are there any specific frets where you are allowed to play all of the notes? Are there any specific frets where you can’t play any of the notes? Taking the time to study fretboard diagrams will improve your knowledge and ability.